Locations in Morgan le Fay's World

Map of Morgan's Cornwall

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Map - Morgan le Fay's Cornwall

The land of Belerion is ruled by Morgan’s father, Gorlois, the Duke of Belerion, circa the late 5th century AD, some 80 to 90 years after the Romans left Britain for good. Belerion is a vassal state of Britain, which at the time of Morgan’s birth is a collective of federate states not including the kingdoms of Cambria (Wales) or the northern realms of the Picts and the Scoti in Caledonia (Scotland). During the early novels of the Fata Morgana Series, the federates of Britain are ruled by High King Vortigern. The Duke’s castle and Morgan’s home is at Tintagel, in the north east of Belerion. Also on the map, to the west, are the independent island kingdoms of Lyonesse and Syllingar, each with their own ruler.

Discover the real-life locations from the series of books. 

 

The Locations in Morgan's World

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Bocka Brae

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Zennor Hill - Real life location

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Locations in Morgan le Fay's World

Map of Morgan's Cornwall

Illustration (C) Miriam Soriano

Click Image to Zoom In
Map - Morgan le Fay's Cornwall

The land of Belerion is ruled by Morgan’s father, Gorlois, the Duke of Belerion, circa the late 5th century AD, some 80 to 90 years after the Romans left Britain for good. Belerion is a vassal state of Britain, which at the time of Morgan’s birth is a collective of federate states not including the kingdoms of Cambria (Wales) or the northern realms of the Picts and the Scoti in Caledonia (Scotland). During the early novels of the Fata Morgana Series, the federates of Britain are ruled by High King Vortigern. The Duke’s castle and Morgan’s home is at Tintagel, in the north east of Belerion. Also on the map, to the west, are the independent island kingdoms of Lyonesse and Syllingar, each with their own ruler.

Discover the real-life locations from the series of books. 

A brooding, atmospheric hill overlooking the sea and surrounded by the wilds of Penwith Moor. Covered with the strange-shaped stones typical of Cornwall that gave rise to legends of Giants and Spriggans, Zennor Hill is the eerie, creepy Bocka Brae in Book III, Giants in the Earth, which Morgan, Merlin and Hallekin have to climb and cross in the dead of night to reach the faeries’ winter barrows. ‘Bocka’ is the Cornish word for ‘goblin’.

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Bocka Quoit

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Zennor Quoit- Real life location

A lonely, ruined quoit standing in isolation on the moor between Zennor Hill and Sperris Quoit (see also: Spyrys Quoit). Legend has it that Zennor Quoit has mystical powers: if any stones are removed from it, they will find their way back to it in the night. In Book III, Giants in the Earth, Morgan, Merlin and Hallekin pass Bocka Quoit in darkness, and Hallekin explains why the faeries use it as the entrance to their winter barrows.

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Bryanick

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St Agnes Head - Real life location

Considered the most prominent feature of the landscape on the St Agnes Heritage Coast, St Agnes Head and its surrounding cliff tops are the last remnants of a heathland which once spread across Cornwall. The name ‘Bryanick’ is Cornish for ‘pointed hill.’ In legend, Bryanick was the home of the Giant Bolster. In Book III, Giants in the Earth, Morgan encounters Bolster’s wife, Cormelaria, at Bryanick and Bolster himself in the cavern under the hill (see also: The Spar-Stone Grave).

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Dimilioc

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Castle-an-Dinas- Real life location

Castle-an-Dinas is an Iron Age hillfort dating from the 2nd and 3rd centuries BC. It is one of the largest and most impressive hillforts in Cornwall, with 360-degree views of the surrounding countryside. In the Fata Morgana Series it is Dimilioc, the inland stronghold of Morgan’s father Gorlois, Duke of Belerion, a location mentioned by Geoffrey of Monmouth in his History of the Kings of Britain (ca.1136).

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The Forest of Vermilion

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Ancient Forest- Real life location

One of several dense forests remaining on the mainland of Britain. By the time of Morgan’s birth, in the late 5th century AD, many of the ancient forests had already been cleared by the Celts and the Romans to provide land for cultivation and grazing. Nevertheless, a number of the forests and wildwoods endured, with trees of birch, pine, hazel, elm, oak, alder, rowan and yew, and remnants of Cornwall’s ancient woodlands can still be found today. In Book III, Giants in the Earth, the Forest of Vermilion is so named because, even amidst the snow, its trees still blaze bright with vibrant autumn colours.

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Maen Castle

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Maen Castle- Real life location

An Iron Age cliff castle, one of the oldest cliff castles on the Cornish coast and the furthest west of all castles in mainland England, situated between Sennen Cove and Land’s End. In the Fata Morgana Series, it has been captured by the Pendragon brothers, Ambrosius and Uther, with their army from Armorica, and is the base from which they have launched their military campaign to take back the throne of Britain from High King Vortigern.

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Penwith Moor

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West Penwith- Real life location

A peninsula on the far south west corner of mainland Britain. Surrounded by high cliffs, the high rocky moorland rising at its centre is Penwith Moor, which, at the time in which the Fata Morgana Series is set, spreads across almost the entire land. The site of many ancient megalithic and archaeological remains, this is where Morgan has many of her adventures with faeries and Spriggans in Book III, Giants in the Earth (see also: Bocka Brae, Bocka Quoit, Spyrys Quoit, Unnamed Beach, Ynyal).

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Selena Moor

Bodmin Moor - Real life location

(C) Lee Thornberry

A wild, windswept, remote granite moor, the highest and least populated area of Cornwall, containing a wealth of ancient Neolithic and Bronze Age stone circles and cairns, including King Arthur’s Hall, a rectangular enclosure of standing stones, and the Hurlers Stone Circle, said to be people who were turned into stone for playing hurling on the sabbath. Home to wild ponies and a plethora of legends and folk tales, Bodmin Moor is the location of Dozmary Pool, believed to be the final resting place of King Arthur’s sword, Excalibur. In the Fata Morgana Series, it is known as Selena Moor, from the old Cornish fairy tale “The Fairy Dwelling on Selena Moor”, where, in Book I, Small Things and Great, Morgan journeys to the realms of the Piskies and the Muryans to fulfil the task she is set by Diana the Moon Huntress.

Bodmin Moor Windswept Tree Lee Thornberr
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Unnamed Beach

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Sennen Cove Beach- Real life location

A beach in the shape of a crescent, close to the furthermost south west point on the English mainland, Sennen Cove Beach today is popular with surfers. In Morgan’s time there was no village, no houses and no harbour nearby; just a wild, windy, lonely beach on the edge of the known world.

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The Spar-Stone Grave

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St Agnes Beacon- Real life location

St Agnes Beacon was, in Cornish tradition, the home of the Giant Bolster (see also: Bryanick). Legend has it that Bolster was a brute who tyrannised his wife (unnamed in Cornish tradition, she is Cormelaria in the Fata Morgana Series). One of the useless tasks he set her was to carry rocks up the hill. In Book III, Giants in the Earth,  a huge, conical-shaped pile of rocks at the peak marks the entrance to the cavern inside the hill where Bolster and Cormelaria live, known as the Spar-Stone Grave. ‘Spar’ is an old mining term meaning ‘crystal.’ Today, in that very spot stands a cairn, with spectacular views in all directions.

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Spyrys Quoit

Sperris Quoit- Real life location

(C) Paul Blades

Not far from Zennor Quoit (see also: Bocka Quoit), Sperris Quoit is the northernmost quoit in Penwith. It is not in as good condition as Zennor Quoit, with only one upright stone remaining and three fallen stones. In Book III, Giants in the Earth, Spyrys Quoit is a fully intact burial chamber through which Morgan, Merlin and Hallekin secretly enter the faeries’ winter barrows. ‘Spyrys’ is the Cornish word for ‘sprite’ or ‘fairy.’

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Tintagel Castle

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Tintagel Castle- Real life location

Spectacular castle, peninsula, and island of history, romance and legend; the birthplace of King Arthur, according to Geoffrey of Monmouth. The castle ruins are from the 13th century, and there is evidence of earlier medieval settlements and an Arthurian-era trading centre. On the plateau above the castle are the Castle Gardens, the foundations of a 10th century church, and ‘King Arthur’s Footprint.’ The latter is a man-made hollow in the rock at the highest point on Tintagel Island’s south side, thought to date back to the Dark Ages. On the beach below the castle is ‘Merlin’s Cave.’ In the Fata Morgana Series, beginning in the late 5th century, it is the seat and stronghold of Morgan’s father, Gorlois, Duke of Belerion.

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Trecobben Castle

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Trecobben Hill Fort - Real life location

Trencrom (or Trecobben) Hillfort is an early neolithic structure featuring a wall of large stones or menhirs linking natural outcrops of rock which enclose a wide area. There are hut circles within the enclosure and gateways/entrances at the north, west, south and east. The views from all sides of the Hillfort are magnificent. In legend, Trencrom was said to have been built by fearsome Giants, who would drag their captives up to the dreaded castle to sacrifice them or eat them. The treasures of these Giants are said to be buried deep in the hill below the fort (see also: Trencrom Hill), and are guarded by spells and Spriggans. In Book III, Giants in the Earth, Trecobben Castle is the home of the Giant Trecobben, his wife Gargamotte, and two monstrous Giants by the names of Gog and Magog.

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Trencrom Hill    

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Trencrom Hill - Real life location   

The location of Trecobben Castle, situated on the northeastern edge of the West Penwith granite massif, and the site of one of Morgan’s most terrifying adventures in Book III, Giants in the Earth. Trencrom Hill is rumoured to be the location of the treasures of the Giants of Trecobben, and is especially notable for being one of the few places in Britain where the sun both rises from and sets into the sea. There are two wells on the hill slopes, one known as Giant’s Well, the other as Trencrom Castle Well, both of which play pivotal roles in the book.

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Unnamed Settlement

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Mawgan Porth- Real life location

A beach and small hamlet on the north coast of Cornwall where the River Menalhyl (the River Glyvion in the Fata Morgana Series) meets the sea. Archaeological excavations in the 20th century discovered a Dark Ages village of three groups of buildings and a burial ground dating from the 9th to the 11th century. In Book III, Giants in the Earth, set in the late 5th century, it is the site of the small unnamed settlement of roundhouses where Morgan and Merlin arrive after following the river from the forest to the coast.

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Ynyal

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Gurnard's Head- Real life location

A dramatic rocky promontory on the north coast of the Penwith peninsula, said to have been given its name because of its resemblance to the head of a gurnard fish. The granite cliffs around it are very distinctive, ringed with black. On the headland itself are the remnants of an Iron Age fort or cliff castle known as Trereen Dynas. It is here where, in Book III, Giants in the Earth, Morgan and Merlin have a memorable encounter with the monstrous Spriggans. Its Cornish name, “Ynyal”, means “desolate one.”